Brenda Fassie – My Baby

Brenda Fassie – My Baby: A Tribute to the Queen of African Pop


Brenda Fassie - My Baby: A Tribute to the Queen of African Pop

Brenda Fassie was a South African singer, songwriter and activist who rose to fame in the 1980s and 1990s with her catchy and controversial songs that addressed social issues such as apartheid, racism, poverty and women’s rights. She was dubbed the “Queen of African Pop” and the “Madonna of the Townships” for her popularity and influence across the continent and beyond.

One of her most beloved songs was “My Baby”, released in 1991 as part of her album Memeza. The song is a tender and upbeat love ballad that showcases Fassie’s powerful vocals and charisma. The lyrics express her devotion and gratitude to her lover, who makes her feel happy and alive. The song also reflects Fassie’s personal life, as she was married to Nhlanhla Mbambo at the time and had a son named Bongani.

“My Baby” was a huge hit in South Africa and other African countries, as well as in Europe and Australia. It won several awards, including the South African Music Award for Song of the Year in 1992. It also became an anthem for many couples and families who related to its message of love and joy.

Brenda Fassie passed away in 2004 at the age of 39, after suffering a cardiac arrest. She left behind a legacy of music that inspired millions of people and challenged the status quo. Her songs are still played and celebrated today, especially “My Baby”, which remains one of her most popular and enduring hits.

If you want to listen to “My Baby” by Brenda Fassie, you can find it on various music platforms such as YouTube , Spotify, Apple Music and Deezer. You can also read the lyrics of the song on Lyrics.com and sing along with the catchy chorus. The song is in Zulu and English, and it features some slang words such as “Ucov’iXhos’eli-wrongo” which means “You’re wearing Xhosa clothes wrongly” or “Thatha MaBrrrrr” which is a reference to Fassie’s nickname.

“My Baby” by Brenda Fassie is not only a song, but also a cultural phenomenon that celebrates African music and identity. It showcases Fassie’s talent and personality, as well as her love for her family and fans. It is a song that has transcended time and space, and has touched the hearts of many people around the world. It is a song that deserves to be remembered and honored as one of the best songs ever made by the Queen of African Pop.

Brenda Fassie was not only a successful singer, but also a trailblazer and a role model for many aspiring artists in South Africa and beyond. She was one of the first Black women to break into the mainstream music industry and to achieve international recognition. She was also one of the first openly bisexual celebrities in South Africa, and a vocal advocate for human rights and social justice. She used her music to challenge the oppressive apartheid regime and to celebrate the diversity and resilience of the African people.

Brenda Fassie was born on 3 November 1964 in Langa, a township near Cape Town. She was named after the American singer Brenda Lee. She started singing at a very young age, accompanied by her mother who was a pianist. She formed her first band, the Tiny Tots, when she was only five years old. She attracted tourists who paid to hear her sing. When she was 16 years old, she moved to Soweto, Johannesburg, to pursue her musical career. She joined the vocal group Joy, and later formed her own band, Brenda and the Big Dudes.

She rose to fame in 1983 with her hit single “Weekend Special”, which became the fastest-selling record at the time. The song was popular not only in South Africa, but also in other African countries, as well as in Europe, Australia and Brazil. She toured extensively with her band, and earned the nickname “The Madonna of the Townships” for her popularity and influence. She also released several solo albums, such as Too Late for Mama (1989), which achieved platinum status and featured the song “Black President”, a tribute to Nelson Mandela.

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